global transport and production, fumigants, containers, chemicals, glyphosate

Selected publications related to global transport and production, fumigants, containers, chemicals, glyphosate by Prof. Dr. med. Xaver Baur:

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Questionnaire fumigants, chemicals

2.3 Anthropogenic emission sources Prev Chapter 2. Emission of air pollutant

See also website of IJPC-SE

Further information on pollution and glyphosate:

The Agricultural Health Study

Glyphosate Use and Cancer Incidence in the Agricultural Health Study. Andreotti et al.,

The Agricultural Health Study (AHS) is a ongoing  prospective cohort of licensed pesticide applicators enrolled in Iowa or North Carolina, Note that the authors do not provide data on expose (no human biomonitoring no ambient monitoring data is collected within the study). The pesticide use data is based on a follow-up questionnaire that was administered five years after enrollment and completed by 63% of the participants. In the recent data update the authors could not observe a  associations between glyphosate use and overall cancer risk or  total lymphohematopoietic cancers, including NHL and multiple myeloma. However, there was evidence of an increased risk of AML (acute myeloid leukemia) for applicators, particularly in the highest category of glyphosate exposure compared with never users of glyphosate. The authors  truncated cancer incidence follow-up in 2005 to be concurrent with the last exposure information. Based on 26 exposed cases,there was an increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) compared with never users (RR = 2.44, 95% CI = 0.94 to 6.32, Ptrend = .11), though this association was not statistically significant. Expeditious efforts to replicate these findings are warranted.

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Expert opinion on adherence to the rules of good scientific practice in the subsections “B.6.4.8 Published data (released since 2000)”, “B.6.5.3 Published data on carcinogenicity (released since 2000)” and “B.6.6.12 Published data (released since 2000)” in the report “Final addendum to the Renewal Assessment Report. Risk assessment […] for the active substance GLYPHOSATE […]”,  October 2015, 4322 pages

by Dr. Stefan Weber

Expert opinion on Glyphosate Task force report

“The expert’s task was to compare the three subsections B.6.4.8, B.6.5.3 and B.6.6.12 of the report “Final addendum to the Renewal Assessment Report. Risk assessment […] for the active substance GLYPHOSATE […]”, October 2015, 4322 pages (hereafter: report) with document M in annex II, section 3, point 5: “Toxicological and toxicokinetic studies” of the license application “Glyphosate & the IPA-, K-, NH4- und DMA salts of glyphosate […] Application for Renewal of Approval […]” by the ‘Glyphosate Task Force’ (author reference: “Monsanto Europe S.A. on behalf of the ‘Glyphosate Task Force’”), May 2012, Belgium, 1027 pages (hereafter: application) for text concordances.”

Summary: “It is absolutely correct to call this plagiarism in the sense of scientific misconduct because the presumed author, the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), is committed to the same principles of good scientific practice as universities, and defines the concept of plagiarism in the same way. The systematic omission of 1) indications and 2) source references over several pages can only be interpreted as deliberately concealing the origin of the text in the sense of conditional intent. Formal errors must be excluded…… All in all, the writers of the report must be accused of significant scientific misconduct and of fulfilling all the definitional criteria of text plagiarism in the sense of conscious deception about the true authorship.”